Relaunching Your Career (3 of 3)


By Teri Hockett

Relaunching your career is a major change in your life. The last two weeks you cleared the calender then learned tips on sharing your news with the family and enlisting their support. This is the final blog of the series that addresses the three major steps to help you relaunch your career.

Step 3- Create Your Own Career Management Team

Build Your Team

Source: mscareergirl.com

One thing I learned from my hours of research is that re-entering the workplace or finding a job in general can be a lonely experience. Support is critical to many aspects of the process.

Support can be found in many places, such as friends, family, previous work associates or bosses. Locate someone who currently works in the field that you want to get into and ask for their help. Your team should consist of people who can help you manage your career and launch an effective job search. Being part of a team makes the journey that much more enjoyable and you can achieve so much more.

Access your career management team to have discussions about Step 1: Make finding a job your job! Carve out the time in your life/schedule, and Step 2: Talk to your family. Your team would be a great place to identify your dream job, discuss your passions and expand your search.

Women chatting

Source: connectingtowomen.com

Team members are an excellent source for help with reviewing and editing resumes and covers letters. They can also help you prepare for job interviews by running mock interviews, along with asking questions afterwards such as:

  • What went well?
  • What did not?
  • What would you do differently?

A team can greatly improve your odds of reentering the workplace quickly and make the process a lot more fun! I believe it’s true that “two heads are better than one” especially in this case. Also, having to be accountable to someone will help keep you motivated and on track. Most importantly, it will get you out of the house!

So, you have cleared your calendar, shared the news with your family and created your career managment team – let the search begin!

About the Author

Teri Hockett

Teri Hockett is the CEO of What’s For Work? The Premier Career Site for Women.

About What’s For Work?

The Premier Career Site for Women. Real People. Real Connections. Real Support. — with everything in one place! http://www.whatsforwork.com/

Mission: To redefine how employers acquire talent and women find and preserve their dream jobs using innovative technologies.

Company Overview: What’s For Work? helps women take control of their careers by providing a rich set of tools that develop their knowledge, skills and confidence they need to land and preserve their dream jobs.
_
Advertisements

Re-launching Your Career (2 of 3)


By Teri Hockett

Re-launching your career is a major change in your life. Last week you cleared the calendar, this week you will learn tips on sharing your news with the family and enlisting their support. This is the second blog in a series of three that addresses the three major steps to help you re-launch your career.

Step 2- Talk to your family

The next thing you need to do is sit down and have a conversation with your family about what you’re doing. One of the challenges faced by women (or anyone who is out of work) returning to the workplace – is that all of a sudden their loving, supportive family turns into one of the biggest obstacles to their success.

The reason is simple. If you’ve been home for a few years or even a few months you are the one who is expected to do all of the things they have not had to do for themselves. You make dinner, pick up the dry cleaning, walk the dog, drive carpool, shop for groceries, and take the car in for service. The list goes on and on.

Family chores

Source: kids.lovetoknow.com

This may seem obvious but women tell us all the time that this is one of the first and most formidable challenges they (and the family) face when the decision is made to return to work. Even just the discussion of returning to work can wreak havoc in the household.

The best way to minimize frustration and stress is to recognize that there will be changes which will likely require everyone to take on new/additional responsibilities. Address these changes up front through open communication.

Let them know how much time you need to work on your job search and what your schedule looks like. Tell them when you are “not available”, even if you are home.  When they come to you with questions or requests like they are accustomed to doing, you may need to remind them, perhaps with a pre-arranged silent signal, that you are working.  It may take a while to transition from the habits that have been formed during the time you have been at home. Letting them know and being clear about when you are and are not available will make it easier for everyone.

By the way, if you are someone who has developed a full social or volunteer calendar since the last time you worked in the business community, you will need to take some time to assess which commitments you can realistically maintain.  There is only one you, and your plate can only hold so much, so you will likely need to make some choices. Be sure to have a similar conversation with all your friends and others who depend on you.

Finally, as you delegate some of your current tasks to others like your spouse or children, keep your expectations realistic. It is possible, even likely, that they will not do the same job you would do. This can be a great opportunity for the family to learn from one another and appreciate each other.

Next week: Create Your Own Career Management Team.

About the Author

Teri Hockett

Teri Hockett is the CEO of What’s For Work? The Premier Career Site for Women.

About What’s For Work?

The Premier Career Site for Women. Real People. Real Connections. Real Support. — with everything in one place! http://www.whatsforwork.com/

Mission: To redefine how employers acquire talent and women find and preserve their dream jobs using innovative technologies.

Company Overview: What’s For Work? helps women take control of their careers by providing a rich set of tools that develop their knowledge, skills and confidence they need to land and preserve their dream jobs.
_

Relaunching Your Career (1 of 3)


By Teri Hockett

Over the next three weeks I will address the three major steps to help you relaunch your career.

The thought of Re-entering the workplace can be daunting, at best, especially if you have been at home for several years. I know it was for me. I had left a successful and fulfilling job to raise my two children.

When I first thought about going back to work it was not only scary, but honestly, a bit overwhelming as well. I was plagued by a multitude of questions:

  • Where do I begin?
  • What do I do?
  • Are my skills still relevant?
  • How have things changed?
  • Do I need to go back to school?
  • Will I need new clothes –fortunately, this was an easy one 😉

The more I looked, it seems the less I found. There was no one place that addressed the issues experienced by a mom returning to the workplace after 12 years. So when I came across Dennis Thompson, of Thompson Associates and author of Four Degrees to Your Dream Job, it was kismet. Together we created a step by step process to help anyone get into the job market – no matter how long they have been out.

Step 1- Make finding a job your job! Carve out the time in your life/schedule.

Start by thinking of your job search as your new job and treat it as such. Schedule a minimum of 4- 6 hours a day to work on your job search in addition to anytime you will spend interviewing and commuting to and from meetings, interviews etc. If, in fact, you will commit six hours minimum each day, five days a week it will only be a short time before you find yourself employed.

So, take your calendar out and block out 9 am to 1 pm, Monday through Friday. Now take a look at all your other activities during that time, gym, walk the dog, coffee with the girlfriends, the list goes on and on. Now start moving all those extra activities to another time slot or off the calendar altogether. Set yourself up for success and give yourself the time to be sucessful.

Home Office

Source: kids.lovetoknow.com

BTW- if this seems like a lot, ask yourself, how much time did you or the average person spend on a full time job? Generally the answer is about eight to ten hours, plus commute. It is simple and it’s your choice – however, if you are serious about finding work as fast as possible you will need to put in the time.

Your day time hours are sacred. This is the only time you will have to make calls, receive calls and go to appointments. Remember also that it will take some time to understand, get comfortable and become effective at conducting your job search. It may have been a long time since you’ve had to do this, or may have never done it before. Give yourself room to make mistakes. Expect it to take some time and to have to work / practice to get back in the swing of things again and get good at the job of finding a job.

Next week: Talk to your family.

About the Author

Teri Hockett

Teri Hockett is the CEO of What’s For Work? The Premier Career Site for Women.

About What’s For Work?

The Premier Career Site for Women. Real People. Real Connections. Real Support. — with everything in one place! http://www.whatsforwork.com/

Mission: To redefine how employers acquire talent and women find and preserve their dream jobs using innovative technologies.

Company Overview: What’s For Work? helps women take control of their careers by providing a rich set of tools that develop their knowledge, skills and confidence they need to land and preserve their dream jobs.
_